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Kingborough Sewerage Upgrade Project

Update December 2017

Margate SPS

Initial preparatory works to remove a number of trees are scheduled to begin Wednesday 3 January 2018.

One section of the dog walking track will be closed to the public for 24 hours.

Barriers and directional signage will be in place to ensure users of the area are redirected to alternative tracks and unable to access the area where works are being conducted.

Blackmans Bay Sewage Treatment Plant

Construction on the upgrade of the Blackmans Bay Sewage Treatment Plant is progressing, with bulk excavation complete and pouring of concrete for new structures underway.

The upgraded treatment plant will enable TasWater to decommission three underperforming sewage treatment plants at Howden, Margate and Electrona. Margate and Electrona will be converted to pump stations with sewage transferred to the Blackmans Bay facility.

This will bring important benefits to the environment by removing treated effluent being discharged into North West Bay.

The upgrade will also result in significant improvement in the quality of effluent discharged from the Blackmans Bay plant which is dispersed well out into the lower reaches of the Derwent.

New sewage pipeline to take waste from Margate, Electrona and Howden to the Blackmans Bay treatment plant

Construction of the pipeline is also well underway. There are several crews currently working on different sections of the pipeline.

The rising main connecting the existing sewage pump station located on the eastern side of the Peter Murrell Reserve on Lady Penryhn Drive, to the Blackmans Bay Sewage Treatment Plant is now operational.

Pipeline construction in the Peter Murrell Reserve

The route through the Peter Murrell Reserve emerged from a community consultation process and balanced the community’s expectations with engineering feasibility and costs.

This section of the new pipeline will follow the western boundary of the Peter Murrell Reserve, along a cleared area. It then runs along the Scarborough Fire Trail, an existing infrastructure corridor which already contains both water and sewerage pipes, and above ground power lines. The trail is cleared regularly and used as a walking track by the local community.

The new pipeline then turns into the Lady Penryhn Fire Trail, a similarly disturbed area, and continues to TasWater land which contains an existing sewage pump station and fenced emergency storage lagoon. From here, the new pipeline is connected to existing sewage infrastructure through the Reserve along the remainder of the Lady Penryhn Fire Trail and back into public roadways.

Environmental management within the Peter Murrell Reserve

To construct the pipeline through the Peter Murrell Reserve, TasWater require approval from Parks and Wildlife in the form of a Reserve Activity Assessment (RAA).

The Parks and Wildlife Service have now approved the RAA and a works authority has been issued in accordance with National Parks and Reserved Land Regulations 2009.

The RAA Activity Plan includes conditions required in conjunction with mitigation strategies outlined in the Construction Environmental Management Plan (CEMP) to manage and control the environmental aspects and potential impacts for the work to be undertaken in the Peter Murrell Reserve.

TasWater are working closely with Parks and Wildlife and Kingborough Council and the Friends of Peter Murrell Reserve to meet the requirements of the conditions.

The work proposed in the Peter Murrell Reserve has been assessed by Parks as unlikely to have any significant impact on nationally threatened species and/or protected migratory species.

Our approach to vegetation management along the entire pipeline route will avoid impacts on threatened species and communities. TasWater has shifted the pipeline around several trees for this purpose. TasWater is working with Parks and Wildlife and the Threatened Species Unit as required.

Some saplings within the power line easement near TasWater’s existing sewage pump station will need to be felled. No mature trees will be removed from within the Peter Murrell Reserve.

The work corridor through the Peter Murrell Reserve will be clearly defined and appropriate safety measures in place.

Weeds and weed hygiene will be managed in accordance with DPIPWE Weed Hygiene requirements. A weed management and hygiene plan is included in the site’s environmental management and includes weed management post construction with regular inspections/assessments at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months.

Ongoing erosion control is required once works are complete until the disturbed areas of the firetrail have revegetated.

No open trenches or holes will be left uncovered overnight.

No dangerous goods such as fuel, oils or chemical will be stored within the Reserve.

TasWater will appoint a suitable qualified environmental specialist/superintendent who will be on site to ensure environmental compliance.

Work is due to start in the Peter Murrell Reserve on Monday 8th of January 2018.

Update December 2017

Margate SPS

Initial preparatory works to remove a number of trees are scheduled to begin Wednesday 3 January 2018.

One section of the dog walking track will be closed to the public for 24 hours.

Barriers and directional signage will be in place to ensure users of the area are redirected to alternative tracks and unable to access the area where works are being conducted.

Blackmans Bay Sewage Treatment Plant

Construction on the upgrade of the Blackmans Bay Sewage Treatment Plant is progressing, with bulk excavation complete and pouring of concrete for new structures underway.

The upgraded treatment plant will enable TasWater to decommission three underperforming sewage treatment plants at Howden, Margate and Electrona. Margate and Electrona will be converted to pump stations with sewage transferred to the Blackmans Bay facility.

This will bring important benefits to the environment by removing treated effluent being discharged into North West Bay.

The upgrade will also result in significant improvement in the quality of effluent discharged from the Blackmans Bay plant which is dispersed well out into the lower reaches of the Derwent.

New sewage pipeline to take waste from Margate, Electrona and Howden to the Blackmans Bay treatment plant

Construction of the pipeline is also well underway. There are several crews currently working on different sections of the pipeline.

The rising main connecting the existing sewage pump station located on the eastern side of the Peter Murrell Reserve on Lady Penryhn Drive, to the Blackmans Bay Sewage Treatment Plant is now operational.

Pipeline construction in the Peter Murrell Reserve

The route through the Peter Murrell Reserve emerged from a community consultation process and balanced the community’s expectations with engineering feasibility and costs.

This section of the new pipeline will follow the western boundary of the Peter Murrell Reserve, along a cleared area. It then runs along the Scarborough Fire Trail, an existing infrastructure corridor which already contains both water and sewerage pipes, and above ground power lines. The trail is cleared regularly and used as a walking track by the local community.

The new pipeline then turns into the Lady Penryhn Fire Trail, a similarly disturbed area, and continues to TasWater land which contains an existing sewage pump station and fenced emergency storage lagoon. From here, the new pipeline is connected to existing sewage infrastructure through the Reserve along the remainder of the Lady Penryhn Fire Trail and back into public roadways.

Environmental management within the Peter Murrell Reserve

To construct the pipeline through the Peter Murrell Reserve, TasWater require approval from Parks and Wildlife in the form of a Reserve Activity Assessment (RAA).

The Parks and Wildlife Service have now approved the RAA and a works authority has been issued in accordance with National Parks and Reserved Land Regulations 2009.

The RAA Activity Plan includes conditions required in conjunction with mitigation strategies outlined in the Construction Environmental Management Plan (CEMP) to manage and control the environmental aspects and potential impacts for the work to be undertaken in the Peter Murrell Reserve.

TasWater are working closely with Parks and Wildlife and Kingborough Council and the Friends of Peter Murrell Reserve to meet the requirements of the conditions.

The work proposed in the Peter Murrell Reserve has been assessed by Parks as unlikely to have any significant impact on nationally threatened species and/or protected migratory species.

Our approach to vegetation management along the entire pipeline route will avoid impacts on threatened species and communities. TasWater has shifted the pipeline around several trees for this purpose. TasWater is working with Parks and Wildlife and the Threatened Species Unit as required.

Some saplings within the power line easement near TasWater’s existing sewage pump station will need to be felled. No mature trees will be removed from within the Peter Murrell Reserve.

The work corridor through the Peter Murrell Reserve will be clearly defined and appropriate safety measures in place.

Weeds and weed hygiene will be managed in accordance with DPIPWE Weed Hygiene requirements. A weed management and hygiene plan is included in the site’s environmental management and includes weed management post construction with regular inspections/assessments at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months.

Ongoing erosion control is required once works are complete until the disturbed areas of the firetrail have revegetated.

No open trenches or holes will be left uncovered overnight.

No dangerous goods such as fuel, oils or chemical will be stored within the Reserve.

TasWater will appoint a suitable qualified environmental specialist/superintendent who will be on site to ensure environmental compliance.

Work is due to start in the Peter Murrell Reserve on Monday 8th of January 2018.

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